AntipodeFoundation.org

A Radical Geography Community

Antipode Foundation Ltd.

The Antipode Foundation is a company (no. 7604241) and charity (no. 1142784) registered in England and Wales.

Registered in July 2011, it exists specifically for public benefit and the promotion and improvement of social scientific research, education and scholarship in the field of radical and critical geography. To this end it enables the pursuit and dissemination of valuable new knowledge that advances the field by:

[i] Producing Antipode: A Radical Journal of Geography, a peer-reviewed academic journal published by Wiley, and its companion website, AntipodeFoundation.org;

[ii] Making grants to support conferences, workshops and seminar series; enable collaborations between academics and non-academic activists; and allow doctoral students to attend international conferences and cover additional research expenses; and

[iii] Arranging and funding summer schools for doctoral students, postdoctoral researchers, and recently appointed junior faculty; and public lectures at international geography conferences.

The Foundation currently has eight trustees – Noel Castree (University of Manchester), Paul Chatterton (University of Leeds), Vinay Gidwani (University of Minnesota), Nik Heynen (University of Georgia), Wendy Larner (University of Bristol), Jamie Peck (University of British Columbia), Jane Wills (Queen Mary, University of London) and Melissa W. Wright (Pennsylvania State University) – and is managed by its secretary, Andrew Kent (antipode@live.co.uk).

Achievements and Performance, 2012-13

The journal

The 44th volume of Antipode was published in 2012; Its five issues contained, across 1,754 pages, a total of 79 papers, 15 book reviews, six ‘interventions’ and an editorial. Highlights include a special issue focusing on ‘anarchist geographies’, a book review symposium on Ananya Roy’s Poverty Capital: Microfinance and the Making of Development, and Melissa Wright’s Antipode RGS-IBG lecture, ‘Wars of Interpretations’. We received a good number of submissions for peer-review: 242 papers (165 of which were new submissions and 77 were re-submissions, that is, papers that had been previously submitted and refereed and then revised and re-submitted). To put this in context, from 2000 to 2003 the journal received approximately 50-60 papers per year; this rose to just over 100 by 2005, approximately 170-180 by 2007, and just under 260 by 2009; in 2010 we received 244 submissions and 240 in 2011. Approximately 32% of all submissions were from the US, 11% from Canada, 17% from the UK, 19% from the rest of Europe, 6% from Australia and New Zealand, and 2% from South Africa.

We’re confident the journal remains popular, and its papers are being read and used in further research: Antipode’s ‘impact factor’ increased from 2.150 in 2011 to 2.430 in 2012 – this means a move up the Thomson Reuters Journal Citation Reports ranking of geography journals from 10th of 73 to 7th of 72; the journal’s online presence also strengthened in 2012, with downloads of Antipode papers from Wiley Online Library increasing from just over 218,000 in 2011 to 262,000 in 2012; and 97% of 2011’s subscriptions were renewed for 2012.

The Antipode Book Series published four strong contributions in 2012/13: Michael Ekers, Gillian Hart, Stefan Kipfer and Alex Loftus’ edited collection Gramsci: Space, Nature, Politics in November 2012; Fiona Mackenzie’s monograph Places of Possibility: Property, Nature, and Community Land Ownership in December; Brett Christophers’ Banking Across Boundaries: Placing Finance in Capitalism in February 2013; and Mark Purcell’s The Down-Deep Delight of Democracy in March. Early reviews suggest the books are being well received both within and beyond geography.

Finally, the trustees believe strong peer reviewing is perhaps the single most important element in ensuring the quality and relevance of papers in Antipode. Our commitment to publishing the best possible papers – writing that is politically-engaged, timely and passionate, and done with theoretical and empirical rigour – would falter were it not for the voluntary labour of our reviewers; mutuality is the lifeblood of journals such as ours. We would like to thank the referees (more than 300 of them!) who gave their time and energy generously, offering insights and expertise to comment on one or more papers in 2012/13.

Graduate Student Scholarship

There were 53 applications for the 2012/13 Graduate Student Scholarship; the majority (47) came from applicants based at North American, European and Antipodean universities. The Scholarship was awarded to Teo Ballvé, a doctoral student in the Department of Geography, University of California, Berkeley, USA. Teo received his award in May 2012 and in that month presented his research, ‘Territories of life and death on a Colombian frontier’, to the Latin American Studies Association meeting in San Francisco. He chaired a session entitled ‘Contando lo narco: Research, methods, and narratives of narco-fueled violence’, bringing together an international group of scholars from literary criticism, geography, cultural studies and journalism to explore the violent explosion of Latin America’s drug wars in recent years. Teo also travelled to Washington DC and New York to conduct research interviews. In September 2012 he presented his research in a video abstract on AntipodeFoundation.org, and published an open-access essay in volume 45, issue 1 of Antipode. Teo is currently completing his PhD at Berkeley and is a journalist in Colombia.

Regional Workshop Awards

The first Regional Workshop Awards were made in 2012. Calls for applications were launched in April on the Foundation’s website and a number of electronic mailing lists used by radical/critical geographers. Applicants were asked to describe prospective events (location and date, participants, planned activities, rationale, etc.); explain their ambitions (how their events will contribute to radical geographic scholarship and practice); and outline plans for outcomes, dissemination and legacies. The deadline for applications was the end of June, by which point the Foundation’s secretary had received 62 applications (one came from an institution in a country classified ‘low-income’ by the World Bank, three from countries classified ‘lower-middle-income’, and five from countries classified ‘upper-middle-income’; the rest came from institutions in countries classified ‘high-income’). Decisions were made in July by the trustees (as per the Foundation’s grantmaking policies, they recused themselves where necessary) and all applicants informed in early August. The following Awards were made:

Trevor Barnes (University of British Columbia) and Eric Sheppard (University of California, Los Angeles) – A history of radical and critical geography (£3,900)

Patrick Bond (University of KwaZulu-Natal) and Brij Maharaj (University of KwaZulu-Natal) – Mapping Durban’s eco-social grievances: The geography of ecological, economic and political problems and protests (£8,000)

Jen Gieseking and the SpaceTime Research Collective (City University of New York), Caitlin Cahill and María Elena Torre (CUNY / Public Science Project) and Tara Mack (Education for Liberation Network) – NYC geographic expedition and institute: Liberation education for geographic inquiry (£10,000)

Roberta Hawkins (University of Guelph), Alison Mountz (Wilfred Laurier University) and Alice Hovorka (University of Guelph) – Regional revolutions: Advancing radical geographical scholarship and practice through feminist geography across the Canada-US border (£5,300)

Dimitra Spanou (Encounter Athens), Dimitra Siatitsa (INURA Athens), Marc Marti (Autonomous University of Barcelona) and Pashalis Samarinis (National Technical University of Athens) – Crises regimes and emerging urban social movements in cities of southern Europe (£10,000)

Unsuccessful applicants were also contacted by e-mail, and the results were made available online. Unfortunately, the trustees were unable to give detailed feedback to unsuccessful applicants (this was made clear prior to application). Grants were made in August 2012 to the City University of New York and the University of Guelph, in September to INURA Athens, in November to the University of KwaZulu-Natal, and in February 2013 to the University of British Columbia. It is a policy of the Foundation not to pay university overheads and indirect costs: there is an established convention in the UK and elsewhere that research grants paid by charities cover only a proportion of the work to be done, with institutions finding the remainder from other funding sources. None of the institutions holding and administering the grants levied such charges.

Scholar-Activist Project Awards

The Scholar-Activist Project Awards were launched just after the Regional Workshop Awards. Calls for applications went out in April on the Foundation’s website and a number of electronic mailing lists used by radical/critical geographers. Applicants were asked to outline their projects (background, participants, planned activities, and rationale); say something about their ambitions, that is, how the project will contribute to radical geographic scholarship and practice; and sketch out planned outcomes, dissemination and legacies. The deadline for applications was the end of June, by which point the Foundation’s secretary had received 105 applications (eight came from institutions in countries classified ‘lower-middle-income’ by the World Bank, six from countries classified ‘upper-middle-income’, and the rest from countries classified ‘high-income’). Decisions were made in July by the trustees (as per the Foundation’s grantmaking policies, they recused themselves where necessary) and all applicants informed in early August. The following Awards were made:

Loretta Lees (King’s College London), London Tenants Federation, Richard Lee (Just Space), Urban Salon and Mara Ferreri (Southwark Notes Archive Group / Queen Mary, University of London) – Challenging the ‘new urban renewal’: Gathering the tools necessary to halt the social cleansing of council estates and developing community-led alternatives for sustaining existing communities (£9,964)

Anant Maringanti (Hyderabad Urban Lab), Vamsi Vakulabharanam (University of Hyderabad), Siddharth Hande (Hyderabad Urban Lab) and Poornima Chikarmane (SNDT Women’s University / SWACCH – waste pickers union) – A spatial political economy of waste in Hyderabad, India: A ‘geography from below’ approach (£10,000)

Pamela Ngwenya (University of KwaZulu-Natal), Marianne Knuth (Kufunda Village) and Bongisipho Phewa (Durban Community Video Collective) – Visioning the future: Exploring youth participatory video and geographical imagination in Zimbabwe and South Africa (£10,000)

Martí Orta (Autonomous University of Barcelona), Jordi Noè (AlterNativa Intercanvi amb Pobles Indígenes) and Yanet Cavallero (Programa de Defensa Indígena – Solsticio-Perú) – Science for indigenous activism: Mapping the impacts of oil companies (£10,000)

Sara Safransky (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill), Linda Campbell (Building Movement-Detroit), Andrew Newman (Wayne State University) and Danielle Atkinson (Mothering Justice) – Uniting Detroiters: Coming together from the ground up (£10,000)

Unsuccessful applicants were also contacted by e-mail, and the results were made available online. Unfortunately, the trustees were unable to give detailed feedback to unsuccessful applicants (this was made clear prior to application). Grants were made in August 2012 to Wayne State University and Kufunda Village Trust, in September to King’s College London, in October to alterNativa Intercanvi amb Pobles Indígenes, and in December to the University of Hyderabad. It is a policy of the Foundation not to pay university overheads and indirect costs: there is an established convention in the UK and elsewhere that research grants paid by charities cover only a proportion of the work to be done, with institutions finding the remainder from other funding sources. None of the institutions holding and administering the grants levied such charges.

The International Conference of Critical Geography

An International Conference of Critical Geography did not take place in 2012, but Wendy Larner maintains the Foundation’s relationship as a member of the International Critical Geography Group’s steering committee.

Antipode lecture series

The year 2012/13 has seen the Foundation spend almost £1,500 sponsoring two lectures:

At the 2012 RGS-IBG annual international conference in Edinburgh, 3rd-5th July, Katherine Gibson – a professor at the University of Western Sydney’s Institute for Culture and Society, Australia – presented ‘Take Back the Economy, Any Time, Any Place: Pedagogies for Securing Community Economies’; and

At the 2013 annual meeting of the Association of American Geographers (AAG) in Los Angeles, 9th-13th April, Christian Parenti – contributing editor at The Nation and professor at the School for International Training Graduate Institute, USA – presented ‘The Environmental State: Territoriality, Violence, and Value’.

The lectures were well attended with approximately 200 delegates at the 2012 RGS-IBG and an audience of 500 at the 2013 AAG. The video of the former lecture has been popular with approximately 250 viewings of thus far (the latter was released in June 2013). As a collection, the Antipode lecture series videos have attracted over 7,000 viewings to date.

A ‘virtual issue’ of Antipode was produced to mark Katherine Gibson’s 2012 RGS-IBG lecture. Entitled ‘Imagining and Enacting Community Economies’, this consisted of 13 papers – either authored/co-authored by Katherine, influenced by her work, or speaking to it in some way – pulled from the digital archive and made open access until the end of December 2012. The issue was well received, and has thus far been viewed almost 1,000 times.

The Institute for the Geographies of Justice

A considerable amount of the organising of the 2013 Institute for the Geographies of Justice occurred in the year 2012/13. (The Institute itself took place between 27th May and 1st June 2013 in Durban, South Africa.) Calls for applications were made in August 2012 on the Foundation’s website and a number of electronic mailing lists used by radical/critical geographers. Applicants were asked to outline their educational and employment histories; list any publications; describe their research interests and work undertaken thus far; list between three and five essays or books that have influenced them and their work; explain their career plans and ambitions; and state whether they’re requesting a travel bursary from the Foundation (and if so list other possible sources of funding). By the end of January 2012 the Foundation’s secretary had received 110 applications (six from institutions in World Bank-defined ‘lower-middle-income’ countries, nine from institutions in ‘upper-middle-income’ countries, and 95 from institutions in ‘high-income’ countries). These were assessed by Nik Heynen, Wendy Larner, Andrew Kent, and an ‘external’ reader in February (each suggested a shortlist of 25 applicants plus ten applicants to be put on a waiting list and consensus was sought) and all applicants were notified of the outcome in March. The 25 successful applicants paid their participation fees in either March or April (these came to just over £3,500), and the 17 awarded travel bursaries received these shortly after (they shared £13,550; the eight not in receipt of travel bursaries had indicated that other funds were available to them).

*         *         *

Finally, the Foundation’s website – AntipodeFoundation.org – continues to receive just under 9,500 page views per month and host all manner of material complementing both Antipode the journal and the wider work of the Foundation. It has advertised the Graduate Student Scholarship, Regional Workshop and Scholar-Activist Project Awards, the lecture series, and the 2013 Institute for the Geographies of Justice, and disseminated sponsored research, as well as hosting video abstracts introducing readers to an author’s forthcoming work and making links between it and the concerns of our times; open access ‘virtual issues’ of the journal that explore the digital archive and highlight groups of papers speaking to issues both timely and ‘timeless’; symposia consisting of critical responses to Antipode papers and authors’ replies; ‘interventions‘ on current affairs that demonstrate the value of a geographical imagination by suggesting how the work of radical geographers (and their fellow travellers) might cast light on them; and reviews (and review symposia) of books, exhibitions, cinema, theatre, music…in fact, any texts that speak to the radical geographical imagination. All material on AntipodeFoundation.org can be downloaded, free of charge, and shared with others as long as producers are credited and work is neither changed in any way nor used commercially.

2 comments on “Antipode Foundation Ltd.

  1. Pingback: Interviews – Meet Antipode’s new Editorial Collective | AntipodeFoundation.org

  2. Pingback: Antipode Foundation Scholar-Activist Project Awards 2014 – the results | AntipodeFoundation.org

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